68°
Sunny
THU
 72°
 47°
FRI
 71°
 45°
SAT
 70°
 43°
SUN
 75°
 42°
MON
 66°
 45°

Kodi Whitfield making name for himself at Stanford

  • Stanford wide receiver Kodi Whitfield, center makes a one-handed touchdown catch next to UCLA cornerback Ishmael Adams, right, and cornerback Anthony Jefferson during the second half of an NCAA college football game on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013, in Stanford, Calif. Stanford won 24-10. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

STANFORD — Kodi Whitfield has spent most of his life trying to live up to the standard his father, Bob Whitfield, set on the field as an All-American at Stanford and a Pro Bowl offensive lineman in the NFL.

Not this week.

The sophomore wide receiver is getting more attention than he ever has entering eighth-ranked Stanford's game at Oregon State on Saturday night. He started making a name for himself with a remarkable one-handed touchdown catch in the Cardinal's 24-10 victory over UCLA last weekend that has been all the talk on campus.

It was the No. 1 college football play of the week on ESPN and the No. 2 play overall behind Shane Victorino's grand slam that sent the Boston Red Sox to the World Series.

"People are telling me now, 'Your son has surpassed you,'" Bob Whitfield said by phone. "It went from people saying, 'Bob Whitfield's son, Kodi,' to people saying, 'Kodi Whitfield's dad, Bob.'"

Nobody is happier than the elder Whitfield about the sudden spotlight swap.

Bob Whitfield was the eighth overall pick in the 1992 draft by the Atlanta Falcons and played 15 seasons in the NFL. His son was born in Atlanta, grew up in Los Angeles and decided to follow in his father's footsteps on The Farm after graduating from Loyola High School.

Kodi Whitfield, known by teammates as "Sweet Feet" for his smooth route running, caught just two passes for 13 yards all of last year as a freshman. He had five catches for 31 yards this season — spending most of his time as a punt returner — until last week, when one did-you-see-that play landed him on televisions and computer screens across the country.

While slicing to his right on a deep route, Whitfield leaped in the air off his left foot and reached up to make a backhanded catch with his right hand between two defenders. The 30-yard TD reception put Stanford up 10-3 in the third quarter.

"I never made a play like that," Bob Whitfield said. "A lot of times having your father who played the sport, it's a segue for TV analysts and stuff. And then what ends up happening is you never shake it, so your identity is still your dad's football career that happened before you. So to go up there, he being a receiver and me being a lineman, it really shows his talent is unique and of course I would never possess. So he kind of came out from under my shadow."

© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View