48°
Cloudy
FRI
 69°
 44°
SAT
 69°
 45°
SUN
 75°
 42°
MON
 66°
 46°
TUE
 62°
 42°

Taliban renews threat against Pakistani teenage girl

  • Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot and injured by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, poses for photographers after being awarded the International Children's Peace Prize 2013 during a ceremony in the Hall of Knights in The Hague, Netherlands. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — The Taliban has issued a new threat against Malala Yousafzai, the teenager who was shot in the head by one of its fighters a year ago after she refused to halt her efforts to expose the plight of schoolgirls in northwestern Pakistan.

In a telephone interview late Monday night, a top Taliban spokesman said the group will continue to look for opportunities to harm the 16-year-old girl so long as she remains an outspoken critic of efforts to impose strict Islamic law in Pakistan.

The threat comes amid speculation that Yousafzai, who sought refuge in England last year, is a leading contender to win the Nobel Peace Prize when it is announced Friday. She is already the youngest person ever nominated for the prestigious honor, and if she won, would be only the second Pakistani in history to be recognized by the Nobel prize committee.

Yousafzai's family and friends say that winning the Nobel Peace Prize would represent a milestone for efforts to draw attention to the problems faced by women and children in Pakistan's male-dominated culture. But some Pakistanis remain skeptical of Yousafzai's motives, highlighting the broader societal split over the country's ideological future.

"Malala has been able to tell the world what is happening to Pakistan and how we are suffering," said Kashmala Tariq, a former member of Pakistan's National Assembly and frequent critic of the government's policies toward women. "It has brought the eyes of the world to Pakistan."

After Yousafzai defied a Taliban campaign to shutter or bomb hundreds of schools in Pakistan's remote Swat Valley, a gunman boarded her school bus on Oct. 9, 2012, and shot her and two of her classmates. Yousafzai survived after being airlifted to London for treatment and within months was one of the world's most recognized humanitarians.

Over the past year, Yousafzai has spoken at the United Nations, had a New York-based charity for girls named after her, was a runner-up for Time Magazine's 2012 Person of the Year and has been honored by dozens of organizations, including the Clinton Global Initiative.

© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View