50°
Cloudy
WED
 68°
 46°
THU
 66°
 47°
FRI
 60°
 42°
SAT
 64°
 45°
SUN
 66°
 43°

Nobel-winning Irish poet Seamus Heaney dies at 74

  • A Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2004 photo from files showing former Nobel Prize winning poet Seamus Heaney speaking during a rehearsal for the Northern Irish national Holocaust commemoration at the Waterfront Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison, File)

DUBLIN — To all lovers of the perfectly weighed word, Seamus Heaney offered hope on this side of the grave.

Heaney, 74, died Friday in a Dublin hospital some 18 years after he won the Nobel prize for literature and gained global recognition as Ireland's greatest poet since William Butler Yeats.

He left behind a half-century's body of work that sought to capture the essence of his experience: the sour smells and barren beauty of Irish landscapes, the haunting loss of loved ones and of memory itself, and the tormented soul of his native Northern Ireland.

As one of the world's premier classicists, he translated and interpreted ancient works of Athens and Rome for modern eyes and ears. A bear of a man with a signature mop of untamed silvery hair, he gave other writers and fans time, attention, advice — and left a legacy of one-on-one, life-changing moments encouraged by his self-deprecating, common-man touch.

"He was a wonderful nature poet, a love poet, and a war poet. He certainly addressed the darkness of what we call 'the troubles'," said Michael Longley, a Belfast poet and longtime Heaney confidant, who recalled chatting happily with Heaney over whiskey and pints of beer earlier this month at a western Irish literary festival.

"I told him I'd been re-reading his early works from the 1960s, and I just couldn't believe that as a young man he was capable of writing such miracles. He continued to write miracles throughout his life," Longley said. "He was a poet of extraordinary complexity and profundity, so it's surprising and remarkable that he also could be so popular. ... It's not popular, poetry. Seamus made it popular."

Heaney rarely turned down requests to speak, and kept globe-trotting to university lectures and cultural seminars despite a 2006 stroke that forced him, temporarily, to slow down. Audiences sought to hear his readings in person, delivered in his melodic baritone. He inspired respect and love.

© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View