59°
Sunny
SAT
 70°
 45°
SUN
 75°
 45°
MON
 68°
 45°
TUE
 62°
 41°
WED
 69°
 44°

California teen is home after harrowing rescue

  • Brett Anderson, wearing a shirt featuring a photo of his daughter, Hannah, makes a statement regarding her kidnapping and rescue at a news conference Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in San Diego. Anderson is flanked by FBI agent Rob Howe. James Lee DiMaggio, 40, suspected of killing Hannah's mother and brother before fleeing with her in the Idaho wilderness, was killed in a shootout with law enforcement on Saturday. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

SAN DIEGO — A 16-year-old girl who was rescued during an FBI shootout with her captor in the Idaho wilderness is resting at home with family and friends to begin what her father says will be a slow recovery.

"She has been through a tremendous, horrific ordeal," said Brett Anderson, who declined to answer questions after reading a brief statement Monday. He pleaded for privacy.

Christopher Saincome, Hannah's grandfather, said his son-in-law wanted to take Hannah with him to Tennessee, where he recently moved. Saincome urged him to have her stay in the San Diego area, where she grew up and has a large circle of friends.

California Teen Rescued In Idaho

X

"I think she needs to be here with friends," Saincome said. "I know she's taking it very tough. One of her best friends is with her, talking to her."

Anderson is a gymnast at El Capitan High School in Lakeside, an east San Diego suburb of 54,000 people, where she also participated in an advanced dance class. The incoming junior recently celebrated a birthday with about two dozen friends at a San Diego cabaret bar.

Her world turned upside down Aug. 4, when, according to authorities, a longtime family friend abducted her after killing her mother and younger brother and abandoning them in his burning house in Boulevard, a remote town 65 miles east of San Diego on the U.S.-Mexico border. James Lee DiMaggio, 40, died in the shootout Saturday with FBI agents at an alpine lake.

Hannah Anderson didn't know her mother and brother were dead until she was rescued, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said.

"I can't make it any clearer: She was a victim in this case. She was not a willing participant," Gore said at a news conference with Hannah's father at sheriff's department headquarters, which served as a command post during a massive 6-day search that spanned much of the western United States and parts of Canada and Mexico.

© The Press Democrat |  Terms of Service |  Privacy Policy |  Jobs With Us |  RSS |  Advertising |  Sonoma Media Investments |  Place an Ad
Switch to our Mobile View